Dementia and alzheimer’s

We prioritise getting to know your loved one to ensure we match them with the right care professional. We consider personalities, interests and hobbies. We also take the time to learn about your loved one’s daily routine so that we can fit seamlessly into their life, maintaining their usual daily habits.

Share This Post

What Is The Difference Between Dementia And Alzheimer’s Disease?

Dementia is a condition where problems with memory or other types of thinking make it hard for a person to do every day activities by themselves. It can be caused by several different diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the the most common cause of dementia.

Alzheimer’s disease starts in the brain many years before symptoms start to show. Early symptoms are mild and so don’t stop someone doing their normal everyday activities. It’s only later that symptoms become severe enough to be called ‘dementia.’

Other common causes of dementia include vascular disease, which prevents blood from getting to the brain properly, and Lewy body disease.

Just as with Alzheimer’s, these diseases develop in the brain over many years. Eventually they lead to vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia (alzheimer’s.org.uk).

About Dementia

Dementia is a group of symptoms. caused by different diseases that damage the brain. The symptoms get worse over time and include:

  • memory loss
  • confusion and needing help with daily tasks
  • problems with language and understanding
  • changes in behaviour.

What Causes Dementia?

Dementia disease damages nerve cells in the brain, making it unable to work properly. These diseases affect the brain in different ways, resulting in different types of dementia.

Dementia is progressive, which means symptoms may be relatively mild at first, but they get worse over time; there are many types of dementia

Types Of Dementia

Alzheimer’s Disease: is the most common type of dementia, the first signs of Alzheimer’s are problems with their memory, thinking, language or perception.

Vascular Dementia: Vascular dementia is the second type of dementia, early signs of vascular dementia include problems with planning or organising, making decisions or solving problems.

Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB): is caused by Lewy Body disease (a disease associated with abnormal deposits of a protein in the brain). Symptoms of DLB include having difficulties staying focused, experiencing delusions, and problems with movement and sleep. It is closely related to Parkinson’s disease. Dementia affects everyone differently but each type has some common early symptoms.  A person may also have mixed dementia where they have symptoms of more than one type.

Common Early Signs And Symptoms Of Dementia:

  • Memory loss – for example, problems recalling things that happened recently.
  • Difficulty concentrating, planning or organising – for example, struggling to make decisions, solve problems or follow a series of steps (such as cooking a meal).
  • Problems with language and communication – for example, difficulties following a conversation or finding the right word for something.
  • Misunderstanding what is being seen – for example, problems judging distances (such as on stairs) or perceiving the edges of objects, and misinterpreting patterns or reflections.
  • Being confused about time or place – for example, losing track of the time or date, or becoming confused about where they are.
  • Mood changes or difficulty controlling emotions – for example, becoming unusually anxious, irritable, sad or frightened, losing interest in things and personality changes.
  • With some types of dementia, the person may have difficulty knowing what is real and what isn’t. They may see or hear things that are not really there (hallucinations), or strongly believe things that are not true (delusions).

 

Who Gets Dementia?

There are currently around 900,000 people in the UK living with dementia. It mainly affects people over the age of 65. The likelihood of developing dementia increases significantly with age. One in 14 people aged over 65 has dementia. This rises to 1 in 6 for people aged over 80.  

Dementia can affect younger people too. This is often called young-onset dementia. Around 1 in 20 people with dementia are younger than 65. There are more than 42,000 people in the UK under 65 with dementia. 

Dementia is also more common among women than men. This information was adapted from: Alzheimer’s Society (alzheimers.org.uk).

Treatments For Dementia

There is currently no cure for dementia. However, there are drugs and non-drug treatments that can lessen a person’s symptoms. Non-drug treatments includes:

  • Treating the person with dignity and respect
  • understanding their history, lifestyle, culture and preferences, including their likes, dislikes, hobbies and interests
  • looking at situations from the point of view of the person with dementia
  • providing opportunities for the person to have conversations and relationships with other people
  • ensuring the person has the chance to try new things or take part in activities they enjoy. For more information on the above please visit: alzheimers.org.uk

 

We at Careservicing4u understands how difficult living with dementia can be. Therefore, we provide person-centred care by adapting your loved ones care to their interests, abilities, history and personality.

All our care professionals are highly trained in caring for clients with dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease, providing not just a source of support for your loved one’s personal and day-to-day domestic needs, but also as a trusted friend and companion.

We can enable your loved ones to live with dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease, by providing them with a range of cognitive therapies which help to keep their brain active. These include puzzles, talking about the news or doing something creative such as singing; creating memory books with them; taking them on a fun day out. These treatments can improve their moods, wellbeing and memory.

We prioritise getting to know your loved one to ensure we match them with the right care professionals. We consider personalities, interests and hobbies. We also take the time to learn about your loved one’s daily routine so that we can fit seamlessly into their life, maintaining their usual daily habits.

With Careservicing4u, your loved one will always have a friendly, respectful and kind-hearted person to talk to, who is sensitive to the challenges and frustrations that affect the family.

If you are looking for home care services for a loved one who has a diagnosis of dementia or Alzeheimer’s Disease get in touch with our friendly care team today email us at careserviving4u@outlook.com

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Get updates and learn from the best

More To Explore

Care News

Dementia and alzheimer’s

We prioritise getting to know your loved one to ensure we match them with the right care professional. We consider personalities, interests and hobbies. We also take the time to learn about your loved one’s daily routine so that we can fit seamlessly into their life, maintaining their usual daily habits.

Do You Want To Boost Your Business?

drop us a line and keep in touch

Do you or one of your family members have a disability and need assistance and support in living independently?

We can help you!

Subscribe To Our Mailing List :-)